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The CHRIS project Cooperative Human Robot Interaction Systems

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People

Bristol Robotics Laboratory

Chris Melhuish, Project Co-ordinator

Chris Melhuish

Professor Chris Melhuish is Director of the Bristol Robotics Laboratory (BRL), and holds Professorial Chairs at both the University of Bristol and the University of the West of England, Bristol. He has 17 years experience in designing and constructing advanced robotic equipment. The last 10 years have been spent working specifically on autonomous robot systems. He has worked on many aspects of collective minimalist techniques including locomotion kinesis and taxis, secondary swarming, formation of 'work gangs', collective behaviour transition and building using stigmergy. His research work has resulted in over 100 publications in international refereed journals and conferences. Chris has been asked to deliver invited talks at a number of academic, funding body and advanced industrial organisations, including advanced topics workshops at Universities in the UK and across Europe. Seven awarded research grants since 2001 totalled over £2M. He recently joined the ‘Robots for Personal Care’ project team, a combined BSI/ISO standardisation initiative with a safety agenda for human service robots of general relevance to the project proposed here. His directorship of BRL brings a wealth of knowledge on all aspects of advanced robot design, as well as a strong design and manufacturing infrastructure, to the project overall. The BRL's particular area of interest in relation to HRI is non-verbal communication and, particularly, how humans can safely interact with robots, demonstrating object-focused behaviours through gesture and touch.
Chris.Melhuish@brl.ac.uk

Tony Pipe, Lead for work on Safety for Interaction

Tony Pipe

Dr. Tony Pipe is Deputy Director of the Bristol Robotics Laboratory, a Reader in Robotics & Autonomous Systems at UWE and a visiting Research Fellow at the University of Bristol. He has 15 years experience of research in advanced robotics, machine learning and adaptive behaviour applied to intelligent & distributed control/monitoring systems, and in embedding complex algorithms (such as biologically-plausible spiking neural networks) in re-programmable digital VLSI. He has worked extensively on adaptive joint-controllers for multi-axis robot manipulators, where the focus has been on proving convergence during adaptation and stability of the overall system using Lyapunov theory, and on efficient reaching strategies for redundant robot manipulators. His research work has resulted in over 80 publications in international refereed journals and conferences. Four awarded research grants since 2004 come to a total of £1.7M. Tony also recently joined the BSI/ISO standardisation initiative, ‘Robots for Personal Care’.

Fiona Killard, Project Manager

Fiona Killard

Dr. Fiona C. Killard received her undergraduate degree in Analytical Science from Dublin City University, and went on to complete a PhD in Inorganic Chemistry in 2005 at the same university. She continued her postdoctoral studies in the area of Education and Outreach with particular focus on primary level science education at the Biomedical Diagnostics Institute in DCU. In July 2007 she was appointed as Research Manager at the Office of the Vice-President for Research, DCU where she advised and managed EU funding programmes including FP7. Her scientific background, interdisciplinary experience and knowledge of EU programmes gives her an ideal set of skills to successfully take over the management of this project.
fiona.killard@brl.ac.uk

Stuart Burgess

Stuart Burgess

Prof. Stuart Burgess is Head of the Engineering Design Group and Head of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Bristol University. He has published over 100 technical papers in engineering design and invented seven patented mechanical devices. SB recently designed the solar array deployment mechanism on the £1.4 billion ENVISAT satellite.
Design and Processing Engineering Research Group

Mike Fraser

Mike Fraser

Dr. Mike Fraser is a senior lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bristol. His research is concerned with the public and social interaction with new technology, spanning distributed, physically active, haptic, mobile and ubiquitous systems. Over the past five years, Dr. Fraser has obtained one millon pounds of funding. He is currently a principal investigator on two EPSRC grants and one ESRC grant, concerned in different ways with distributed and mobile interaction and has completed projects funded by the ESRC and EU. He was also co-investigator and research manager of a European Fifth Framework IST Disappearing Computer project (SHAPE) designing, developing and deploying novel technologies in museum settings. He has also contributed to a variety of further projects including the Equator Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration, a six-year major programme of work on merging virtual and physical worlds funded by the EPSRC; Mobile Bristol, a DTI-funded project undertaking technology and user research in city-wide pervasive mobile media; an ESPRIT IV IST Long Term Research Grant called 'Kidstory' developing tangible technologies for classroom collaboration; and an ESRC grant 'Social Interaction through Objects' which studied collaborative work with objects in co-located and virtual environments.
Department of Computer Science

Neill Campbell

Neill Campbell

Neill Campbell is a Reader in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bristol. His main interests are in Computer Vision and Computer Animation. In the CHRIS project his main role is in the analysis and generation (synthesis) of realistic and believable facial emotions and gestures.

Department of Computer Science

Sergey Skachek, Research Associate

Sergey Skachek

Sergey Skachek is a Research Associate at Bristol Robotics Laborotory, UK. He has a MSc in Physics and a PhD in Electrical Engineering. His main interests are robotics, computer simulations, mathematical modelling, software engineering and development. In the CHRIS project he will develop algorithms for gesture recognition and couple them with gaze and facial expressions analysis. He will also be involved in development and programming of safety and human protection modules on BERT platform.

Alex Lenz, Research Associate

Alex Lenz

After completing a traditional apprenticeship programme as an electronics technician in the German manufacturing industry , Alex gained a degree in microelectronics engineering (Dipl. Ing. FH) at the University of Applied Sciences in Trier, Germany. He furthered his education at the University of the West of England, Bristol and successfully completed an MSc Dissertation in the field of embedded on-line learning in November 2002. He has worked for two years for Siemens VDO Automotive as an embedded software development engineer and you can see some of his real-time software running in the new VW Golf V and Passat VI. Alex started working as a Research Associate at BRL in 2005, investigating biologically inspired real-time control algorithms applied to an engineering implementation of vestibulo-ocular reflex. He will be employing his expertise in distributed real-time control, embedded systems and biologically inspired adaptive technologies to make BERT (one of our robots) safer.

Said Ghani Khan, PhD Student

Said Ghani Khan

Said's area of research interest includes Robotics and Control. Said has completed a Masters in Robotics with Distinction from the University of Plymouth, UK in 2006. He holds his Bachelors degree in Mechanical Engineering with Honors from NWFP University of Engineering & Technology Peshawar, Pakistan. After his masters he worked for over a year as a research associate at the GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Pakistan.

MPG - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Felix Warneken, lead for work on cooperative coordination

Felix Warneken

Felix Warneken is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and a visiting researcher at the Max Planck Insititute for Evolutionary Anthropology. He studies the cognitive and motivational prerequisites for cooperative behaviors by testing young children and great apes.
Felix's homepage

Michael Tomasello

Michael Tomasello

Mike is the Co-Director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany. Research interests focus on processes of social cognition, social learning, and communication/language in human children and great apes. Books include First Verbs (Cambridge University Press, 1992); Primate Cognition (Oxford University Press, 1997); The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition (Harvard University Press, 1999); Constructing a Language: A Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquisition (Harvard University Press, 2003); and Origins of Human Communication (MIT Press, 2008).
Mike's homepage

Jasmin Steinwender

Jasmin Steinwender

PhD student at the Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany. She studies cooperation in children and wants to investigate the cognitive prerequisites for cooperation.
Jasmin's Homepage

Katharina Hamann

Katharina Hamann

Katharina is a PhD student at the Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany. She is interested in the development of cooperation in children, particularly with regard to its motivational aspects.

IIT - Fondazione Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia

Giorgio Metta, Lead for work on motor control and mirroring and scenario testing

Giorgio Metta

Giorgio Metta is senior scientist at the IIT and assistant professor at the University of Genoa where he teaches courses on anthropomorphic robotics and intelligent systems for the bioengineering curricula. He holds a MS with honors (in 1994) and PhD (in 2000) in electronic engineering both from the University of Genoa. From 2001 to 2002 he was postdoctoral associate at the MIT AI-Lab where he worked on various humanoid robotic platforms. He is assistant professor at the University of Genoa since 2005 and with IIT since 2006. Giorgio Metta research activities are in the fields of biologically motivated and humanoid robotics and in particular in developing life-long developing artificial systems that show some of the abilities of natural systems. His research developed in collaboration with leading European and international scientists from different disciplines like neuroscience, psychology, and robotics. Giorgio Metta is author or co-authos of approximately 100 publications. He has been working as research scientist and co-PI in several international and national funded projects. He has been reviewer for international journals, national and international funding agencies.
Giorgio's Homepage

Armando Tacchella

Armando Tacchella

Armando Tacchella is Associate Professor of Information Systems at the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Genoa since November 2005. He obtained his Ph.D in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Genoa in 2001 and his “Laurea” (M.Sc equivalent) in Computer Engineering in 1997. Teaching activities include graduate courses in Artificial Intelligence (AI), formal languages, compilers, and machine learning as well as undergraduate courses in design and analysis of algorithms. His research interest are mainly in the field of AI, with a focus on systems and techniques for automated reasoning and machine learning, and applications to the diagnosis f complex systems, formal verification of hardware and software, and cognitive architectures. His interest in the CHRIS project are the formal verification of control software and the automated synthesis of safe learning agents.

Ugo Pattacini

Ugo Pattacini

Ugo Pattacini is a PhD student at the Robotics, Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department of Italian Institute of Technology, Genoa, Italy. His main interests are in control engineering, signal processing and real-time software development for embedded systems. In the CHRIS project he is concerned with the design and the implementation of a modular adaptive controller for the sensorimotor system of a humanoid robot.
Ugo's Homepage

Lorenzo Natale

Lorenzo Natale

Lorenzo Natale is team leader at the Italian Institute of Technology. He received a MS degree in Electronic Engineering in 2000 and PhD in Robotics from the Universtity of Genoa. During his MSc and Ph.D. he worked in the Laboratory for Integrated Advanced Robotics (LIRA-Lab), at the University of Genoa. In the period between 2005 and 2006 he was Postdoctoral researcher at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, working in the Humanoid Robotics Group. His research focuses on developmental robotics, sensorimotor learning and perception in artificial and biological systems. He is also interested in software development and integration.
Lorenzo's Homepage

Matteo Fumagalli

Matteo Fumagalli

Matteo Fumagalli was born in Rochester (Minnesota) on the 22th January 1982. He graduated in mechanical engineering at Politecnico di Milano in July 2007. His master thesis concerned the Impedence Control of Cooperatives Manipulators. During the same year he worked at the departement of electronics and informatics (D.E.I.) of the Politecnico di Milano. There he focused on the dynamic system identification and control and on the modelization of stepper motors. His work at the Politecnico di Milano ended on January 2007, when he reached the IIT where he holds a PhD position. Matteo Fumagalli has a background on the modelization, measurement and control of dynamical system. He is interested in interaction control of manipulators. At the IIT he is working on identification and force control of manipulators.
Matteo's Homepage

Claudia Peschiera

Claudia Peschiera

Claudia Peschiera is a PhD student at the University of Genoa. Her main interests are formal verification and model checking. Her interest in the CHRIS project is to prove the absence of errors in control software using static verification.
Dipartimento di Informatica Sistemistica e Telematica(DIST)
Università di Genova

Luca Pulina

Luca Pulina.jpg

Luca Pulina is a post-doc at the University of Genoa. He obtained his Ph.D. in Robotics from the University of Genoa in 2009 and his "Laurea" (M.Sc equivalent) in Computer Engineering in 2005. His research interest are in the field of AI, with a focus on systems and techniques for automated reasoning and machine learning. His interest in the CHRIS project is the automated synthesis of safe learning agents.
Dipartimento di Informatica Sistemistica e Telematica(DIST)
Luca's homepage


LAAS-CNRS

Rachid Alami, lead for work on decisional planning

Rachid Alami

Rachid is a senior scientist at the Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Group from LAAS. His main research topics are: Mobile Robotics, Control Architectures, Multi-robot cooperation, Task and Motion Planning, Personal and Service Robotics and Human/Robot Interaction.
Rachid's Homepage

Raquel Ros

Raquel Ros

Raquel Ros is a post-doc in the RIS (Robotics and InteractionS) group at LAAS-CNRS, Toulouse, France. She has a MSc and a PhD in Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence). Her main interests are Case-Based Reasoning, robotics and human robot interaction. In the CRHIS project she focuses her work on the decisional planning of a social robot to improve interaction with humans.

Emrah Akin Sisbot

Emrah Akin Sisbot

Emrah Akin Sisbot is a post-doc in Robotics and Interactions group in LAAS-CNRS, Toulouse, France. He has a MSc in Artificial Intelligence and PhD in Robotics. His main interests are motion planning, human-robot interaction and multi-robot cooperation. In CHRIS project, he focuses on geometrical reasoning on human-robot space sharing.
Akin's Homepage

Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali is a PhD student in Robotics and InteractionS (RIS) group in LAAS-CNRS, Toulouse, France. Before starting his PhD, he has done MSc in Artificial Intelligence. His main research interest is the supervision of decisional Human-Robot Interaction. In the CHRIS project his focus will be on development of Robot Memory/Knowledge.

Amit Kumar Pandey

Amit Kumar Pandey

Amit Kumar Pandey is presently working as a Ph.D. candidate in RIS (Robotics and InteractionS) group at LAAS-CNRS, Toulouse, France. He received his MS by Research degree with specialization in Robotics, in 2007, from IIIT-Hyderabad, India. During his MS/R, he worked as Research Assistant at Robotics Research Centre of IIIT-H, where his research focus was on designing and development of a Fully Autonomous Mobile Robot Navigation System equipped with SLAM (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping), Exploration and Path Planning capabilities. His current area of research is in the field of HRI, addressing the various issues associated with task and motion planning, ranging from safety & comfort to intuitive & socially acceptable behavior of Robot in a Human centered environment. In CHRIS project his focus will be on the development of primitives for robot manipulation in a co-operative Human-Robot scenario and its implementation on the Humanoid Robot, HRP-2.
Amit's Homepage

Matthieu Warnier

Matthieu Warnier

Matthieu Warnier is a PhD student in Robotics and Interactions (RIS) group in LAAS-CNRS, Toulouse, France. He worked as a research engineer in LAAS for ten months before starting his PhD. His main interests are robot high level cognitive skills and human robot interaction. In the CHRIS project he focuses his work on the decisional planning of a social robot to improve interaction with humans.

Séverin Lemaignan

Séverin Lemaignan

Séverin Lemaignan is a PhD student in Robotics and Interactions group in LAAS-CNRS, Toulouse, France. He has a MSc in Artificial Intelligence and has in the past worked as an engineer at the INRIA instiute for computing sciences. His main interests are knowledge representation and storage by robots, based on ontologies. In the CHRIS project, he mainly works on the symbolic knowledge base.
Séverin's Homepage

INSERM

Peter Ford Dominey, lead for work on Systems Engineering

Peter Ford Dominey

Peter Ford Dominey is a Research Director with the INSERM. His research interests include understanding and simulating the neurophysiology of cognitive sequence processing and language, and its application to robot cognition and language processing.

Jocelyne Ventre-Dominey

Jocelyne Ventre-Dominey

Jocelyne Ventre-Dominey is Senior Researcher at INSERM-U846 in Lyon, France. Her research interest includes understanding the functional organisation of the cerebral cortex in multimodal representation, including visual and vestibular modalities as well as their interaction with high-order cognitive function like language and memory. Her experimental work in human is directly involved in the actual humanoid robot implementation (iCub).

Stephane Lallee

Stephane Lallee

Stephane Lallee is a PhD Student. He has a licence degree in Computer Sciences and a master degree in Cognition Sciences. His main interests are the modelling of cognition and mind and how to embed these models in a robotic platform.

Jean-David Boucher, PhD student

Jean-David Boucher

The goal of Jean-David's Phd is to create a programm for a human-robot intercation (HRI). The main characteristics of it are: the robot has to learn via the interaction with the user, the user is a naive personn, no computer science knowledge is necessary, the robot has to create new representations for each behavior, the user can reuse these representations, the interaction has to be as fluent as possible.
Jean-David's Homepage

This file last updated Thursday, 03-May-2012 13:05:50 BST

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